How to Clean a Computer Screen

How to Clean a Computer Screen
How to Clean a Computer Screen

When the perfect ray of daylight hits your computer monitor and you squint to see through the scattered fingerprints and dust, the thought enters your mind: “Whoa, when was the last time I cleaned this thing?”

Let’s get your screen clean as soon as possible.

Screens come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and cleaning techniques range depending on the surface. Because the active components in cleaning agents might disrupt the display of sensitive crystals or create irreversible damage in the form of streaks and scratches if you clean your screen incorrectly, it’s vital to know how to clean your individual screen.

Important cleaning tips:

  • Before cleaning, make sure your computer and monitor are turned off.
  • Excess moisture should be avoided, especially while cleaning around plugs and ports.
  • Use lint-free microfiber cloths and avoid rough or abrasive materials.
  • The cleaner should never be sprayed directly onto your screen. Spray it onto a towel and wipe down the screen with it.
  • If you’re unsure about the type of screen you have, consult the manufacturer’s cleaning instructions.
  • It’s a good idea to wipe off the surface of your keyboard and mouse at the same time as you clean your screen because such surfaces harbor a lot of germs. When it comes to dust removal, using a dry microfiber cloth is always the safest option.

Mac Screens vs. PC Screens

Is there a difference between cleaning a Mac screen and cleaning a PC screen? Yes, in a word. Although there are hundreds of various computer and monitor models to pick from, screens are typically backlit LED panels with LCD (liquid-crystal display) pixels or a non-LCD glass-coated surface. Also worth noting is that some of the latest matte glass screens have nano-texture glass, which necessitates the use of a special cleaning cloth from the manufacturer and should be cleaned with nothing else

.LCD displays are more vulnerable to cleaning solutions, but because they’re so ubiquitous on PC laptops and standalone computer monitors, there are a plethora of simple cleaning methods available. They’re not difficult to clean, but you’ll need to be cautious and thorough to avoid damaging the surface or any of the LED parts. Any cleaning containing ammonia will leave a residue. Soap and water can harm your skin. Cleaning an LCD screen with an LCD cleaner free of alcohol, ammonia, and acetone is always the safest and most effective method, but if you need a quick repair, a microfiber cloth sprinkled lightly with a mixture of vinegar and distilled water will suffice.

Most Mac computer displays are glass-coated and can be cleaned and maintained streak-free more readily than LCD goods with glass cleaners such as Windex or cloth sprinkled lightly with rubbing alcohol. Apple sells a special polishing cloth for nano-texture glass screens on items like the Apple Pro Display XDR or the iMac.

How to Clean a Non-LCD (Glass-Coated) Computer Screen

  • Unplug and turn off your gadget.
  • With a dry microfiber towel, remove any dust from the screen.
  • To clean non-porous surfaces like the screen, spray 70 percent isopropyl alcohol onto a cloth, or use a pre-moistened alcohol wipe or a Clorox Disinfecting Wipe; do not use bleach.
  • Wipe the glass surface and corners with a dry wipe or cloth, being careful not to let any moisture wick from the wipe or cloth.
  • Allow for air drying of the screen.
  • If any remaining streaks remain, rub them away using a microfiber cloth.

How to Clean an LCD or LED Computer Screen

  • Unplug and turn off your gadget.
  • Using a dry microfiber towel, wipe away the dust.
  • Mist an LCD cleaning spray over a dust-free side of your microfiber cloth to clean stains and streaks on the screen’s surface; an easy DIY alternative is 1:1 parts white vinegar and distilled water.
  • Wipe the area clean, but avoid getting saturation on the screen’s margins.
  • Allow for air drying of the screen.
  • If any remaining streaks remain, rub them away with the dry edge of the microfiber cloth.

A few tips when it comes to cleaning any screens:

  • Use lint-free microfiber cloths and avoid rough or abrasive materials. Even paper towels may harm a television, and plasma displays are especially vulnerable.
  • The cleaner should never be sprayed directly onto your screen. Spray it onto a towel and wipe down the screen with it.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s cleaning instructions and be cautious if you’re unsure, especially if the only cleaners you have on hand are harsh chemicals with a terrible rep.

How to Clean Battery Corrosion

At one point or another, we’ve all had to deal with messy battery deterioration. It happens softly and gradually, commonly in things that are used seldom, like children’s toys, or in low-energy equipment that doesn’t require frequent battery replacements, such as a remote control. You’re unlikely to notice rust until the product stops working; only then will you open the container to find a mess of white powdered — pseudo rock salt — stuff and that all-too-familiar odor.

Why Does Battery Corrosion Occur?

Science! Corrosion is induced by a chemical reaction that occurs as hydrogen gas builds up inside a battery and eventually has to escape. With age and other conditions such as humidity, batteries (particularly alkaline batteries) have a tendency to leak. The insulating seals will break as the gas pressure forces the battery walls to expand. When the seals on batteries fail, they emit not only hydrogen but also potassium hydroxide. The true cause of the white powder you’ve noticed from time to time is potassium hydroxide, which formed when it reacts with air.

Corrosion is particularly common in non-rechargeable, single-use alkaline batteries, which degrade over time.

Although rechargeable batteries are less likely to fail, they do have the potential to leak and cause minor damage.

Rechargeable batteries are less likely to fail, but they can leak and cause minor corrosion; overcharging or reverse charging are the most typical causes of failure.

Lithium-ion batteries have a tendency to expand. When this occurs, the consequences are hazardous, and the materials must be handled with caution.

Corrosion isn’t a death sentence for your device, but it can prevent your tool or toy from receiving a charge from any new batteries you try to use if left untreated. Cleaning the corrosion aids in the establishment of effective contact points.

Rechargeable batteries are less likely to fail, but they can leak and cause minor corrosion; overcharging or reverse charging are the most typical causes of failure.

Lithium-ion batteries have a tendency to expand. When this occurs, the consequences are hazardous, and the materials must be handled with caution.

Corrosion isn’t a death sentence for your device, but it can prevent your tool or toy from receiving a charge from any new batteries you try to use if left untreated. Cleaning the corrosion aids in the establishment of effective contact points.


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