Top 10 tips for washing your motorcycle

Top 10 tips for washing your motorcycle

Although I’d rather be riding my motorbike than washing it, doing so after a long weekend of riding can be enjoyable and a terrific way to pass a few hours in the company of your closest friend, your bike.

With the help of readers, we revised some of our well-liked advice. Have any additional advice? At the end of the article, in the “Leave a reply” box, please include them.

1: Preparation is key

Take off your tank bags, luggage, and any other accessories, such as GPS, that you don’t want to get wet. Prepare all of your cleaning and laundry supplies as well. A bucket, soap or liquid detergent, bug and tar remover, degreaser and/or engine cleaner, a toothbrush, WD-40, a brush for cleaning tyres, paint polish, metal polish, at least two microfiber rags, 100% cotton sponges, a variety of soft cotton or microfiber towels, abrasive rags, and a chamois for drying are all required.

2 Where and when you wash the bike is also important

Avoid using commercial laundry facilities and wash your own clothes. It is unsafe to do it in a driveway or on the street. Never wash your clothes right away after a long ride. You don’t want to spray cold water on a hot motor, so let the bike cool down. Avoid washing your bike in the middle of the day or in the sun since this might cause streaks by drying the detergent on the bike’s surface before you can rinse it off. Water contaminants, such as mineral deposits, can become much more aggressive when warm, making it more challenging to remove water spots if water is sprayed on a hot bike. If you’re a little eco-friendly, use your lawn to wash.

3: Wash frequently, but don’t overdo it

This requires a little bit of balancing. Regular washing will help you catch any developing issues like fluid or oil leaks, loose or damaged parts, etc. early on. Smashed bugs that are left on your paintwork are more difficult to remove afterwards and may also leave a mark. In addition, squished insects in your radiator may contribute to overheating issues. However, lubricants from cables and exposed grease spots on vintage engines can be replaced if you wash too frequently. You must immediately wash your adventure bike completely if you just returned from the bush and it is covered with muck. Your bike might only require a gentle wash down with some windscreen cleaner if you simply made a quick trip up to your favourite mountain cafe.

4: Wash with water and suitable cleaning agents

Use a minimal amount of water. Use the appropriate cleaning solution for the task. For every purpose, a product exists. However, abrasive cleaners or all-purpose household cleaners should be avoided since they might harm paint or chrome. Detergents should have a pH balance of six to eight to prevent damaging your paint by being either too acidic or too alkaline. Verify if it is safe to use on all types of paint. Avoid using vinyl cleaners on the seat because although it may appear shiny, it will be slick. Rubber gloves are definitely a good idea if you’re employing any harsh chemicals to handle challenging tasks.

5: High-pressure cleaning

This requires a little bit of balancing. Regular washing will help you catch any developing issues like fluid or oil leaks, loose or damaged parts, etc. early on. Smashed bugs that are left on your paintwork are more difficult to remove afterwards and may also leave a mark. In addition, squished insects in your radiator may contribute to overheating issues. However, lubricants from cables and exposed grease spots on vintage engines can be replaced if you wash too frequently. You must immediately wash your adventure bike completely if you just returned from the bush and it is covered with muck. Your bike might only require a gentle wash down with some windscreen cleaner if you simply made a quick trip up to your favourite mountain cafe.

6: Make sure you have the right sponges, rags, chamois, brushes etc

Use different cleaning rags and sponges for various surfaces. Use a different sponge to clean the seat instead of using the same one to remove grease from the wheels because you’ll end up with grease on your seat. Modern cleaning tools come in a huge range of varieties. Clothes made of microfiber are highly efficient and safe for surfaces. However, don’t discount the usefulness of an old toothbrush for cleaning laced wheels or for removing grit and grime from difficult-to-reach places like radiators. In order to clean burnt-on grease and grime from chrome exhaust pipes, you can use the finest-grade steel wool. As some pipes are not properly chromed, test it first underneath the pipe where it cannot be seen to see if it leaves fine swirls. You may.

7: Attention to detail

The distinction between a clean bike and Concours standard is made by this. Spend some time wiping the bike down with a microfiber cloth one last time after you’ve finished washing and polishing it. Check for any locations you may have overlooked by wiping the cables, cleaning the engine casings, rubbing the wheel hubs, and lying down on the ground. Judges will frequently wipe their fingers under the bike when you enter a Concours in order to look for grease and filth. To remove any extra water from difficult-to-reach spots, you might consider purchasing an air compressor. If you are entering a show and shine without riding, only you should use tyre shine on the tyre walls because otherwise, overspray may go into the tread area and negatively damage traction.

8: Waxing can make or break a bike

Cutting chemicals should not be used since they cause paint to permanently swirl. Use a soft wax that adds a layer rather than removes one if you use auto wax, but make careful to do so. For tips on choosing the best auto wax, look here. Some contemporary bicycles are really covered in a layer of lacquer or plastic that is susceptible to damage. First test the product in a discreet location, then examine it in direct sunshine to check for swirls. A high-quality wax will serve as sunscreen and leave a UV barrier to shield your paint from damage. Regular reapplication of wax is necessary to maintain this level of defence. Instead of applying the polish straight to the bodywork, use a clean rag. Buff off when dry.

9: Lube

WD40 works well to remove built-up oil and excess water simultaneously. Because it will dilute the grease, you shouldn’t spray it in areas where there needs to be important grease, like around the wheel axles. Water displacement is what WD stands for and what it performs. The cables, hinges, and levers that might have lost some lubrication in the wash should instead be sprayed with silicon or oil, as it’s not a very effective lubricant. To coat the chain, use a wax spray or special chain lube, and always adhere to the directions on the package.

10: Drying off is the final step

To completely dry off your bike, use a microfiber towel or chamois that has been well cleaned and squeezed. NEVER let any sponge, chamois, or another type of fabric fall on the ground as they can pick up minute grit particles and harm your bike. Ride your bike carefully around the block after you’ve done drying it, pumping the brakes to remove any remaining water. Then take a longer, faster drive on a highway to force water out of narrow crevices. Water can lead to corrosion if it is let to sit. Although you could accomplish the same task with a leaf blower, wouldn’t it be nicer to ride your shiny bike about and show it off? Give you when you go home

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